Women and Infants Affected by Opioids

Screening women for substance use presents opportunities for health care providers to improve the care of women and infants. For women, screening can identify women who need services and begin discussions on how women can prepare for delivery. If pediatric providers are aware of results, they can plan appropriately. If screening does not identify women at risk, pediatric providers have other opportunities to improve the care of infants. Pediatric providers can meet the first challenge by recognizing symptoms suggesting neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS)/NAS and instituting appropriate treatment. Treatment is the second challenge. For infants who are recognized and treated, treatment regimens may vary significantly between practitioners and facilities, affecting cost and length of stay. Standardized protocols for treatment of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome and involvement in quality collaborative initiatives result in decreases in unnecessary health care utilization. The purpose of this project is to close the gaps in care of women and infants.

In 2017, WAPC received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to 1) Increase the capacity of WisPQC; 2) Strengthen the data infrastructure; 3) Improve identification of infants with NAS/NOWS and standardize care; 4) Improve identification of women with opioid use disorder (OUD); and 5) Improve care of women with OUD.

These initiatives are supported by Cooperative Agreement Number, DP006359, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Department of Health and Human Services.

Identification and Care of Infants with NAS/NOWS

Identification of Women with OUD

This initiative will launch in 2019.

Care for Women with OUD

This initiative will launch in 2021.